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Natural Antioxidants

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Natural Antioxidants: what are the main ones and where to find them?

The antioxidants exogenousamong which they are included vitamin Avitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, carotenoids, lycopene, coenzyme Q-10 and lipoic acid are present in most foods of plant origin.
In particular, they are abundant in black and very dark fruit, such as berries.

Natural Antioxidants: ORAC scale

Boston University and the US Department of Agriculture conducted a series of studies to establish the antioxidant power of various foods. The antioxidant power was measured on the basis of a scale, theORACaccording to which higher values ​​(greater units) correspond to greater antioxidant powers:

Cucumbers 1 = 36 units

Tomatoes 1 = 116units

Apricots 3 = 172 units

Raw spinach 1 plate = 182 units

Three slices melon = 197 units

Pear 1 = 222 units

Banana 1 = 223 units

Draw 1 = 248 units

Apple 1 = 301 units

Eggplant 1 = 326 units

White grapes 1 bunch = 357 units

Onion 1 = 360 units

Black raisins 1 tablespoon = 396 units

One cup cooked cauliflower = 400 units

Cooked green beans one cup = 404 units.

American potato 1 = 433 units

Kiwi 1 = 458 units

Pepper 1 = 529 units

Black grapes one bunch = 569 units

Avocado 1 = 571 units

Roast potato 1 = 575 units

Plum 1 = 626 units

Orange 1 = 983 units

Orange juice 1 glass = 1142 units

Strawberries one cup = 1170 units

Pink grapefruit 1 = 1188 units

Grapefruit juice 1 glass = 1274 units

Cooked Brussels Sprouts 1 cup = 1384 units

Black plums 3 = 1454 units

Blackberries 1 cup = 1466 units

Cooked beetroot 1 cup = 1782 units

Cooked spinach 1 cup = 2042 units

Cooked green cabbage 1 cup = 2048 units

Blueberries 1 cup = 3480 units

Black grape juice 1 glass = 5216 units

It is interesting to note how the list of the antioxidant power of various foods according to the ORAC scale, updated in 2010, has been removed from the USDA website; in a note, the department justifies this choice with:

  1. The scarcity of clinical data to support the effective in vivo transferability of antioxidant tests carried out in vitro;
  2. The absence of sufficient evidence to believe that the beneficial effects of foods rich in polyphenols can be attributed to their antioxidant properties.

Today, it is known that food-derived antioxidant molecules have a wide range of functionsmany of which are unrelated to the ability to absorb free radicals.

Their beneficial effect on health would therefore appear to derive from mechanisms of action independent of antioxidant power.

To know more:
Antioxidant foods: What are they?

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